Loading...

FAQs

Simplifying Cremation for our Hometown.

FAQs

We’ve provided a list of answers to questions we frequently receive regarding our services and other activities related to funerals. If you don't see the answer to your question here, feel free to contact us. We'd be happy to give you more information and clarify any of your concerns.

What does Simply Cremations do?

What does Simply Cremations do?

At Simply Cremations, we are relieved to finally provide a low cost alternative for performing a cremation for your loved one. Rather than using a funeral home, which may be providing more services than you require; Simply Cremations does only one service: Cremation.

Our affordable price is fair, with no hidden costs or purchase commitments to qualify for. You will always see value in what you pay and the services you receive. Our price is $1195.

When your loved one passes, we will arrive in a timely manner and transport them to our local facility where they will stay in a refrigerated space until receiving the authorization to cremate from the State of Florida. At that point we will perform the cremation and deliver the remains in a temporary container to the responsible party.

Simply Cremations will handle all of the paperwork required for cremation, we will also file for the Death Certificates, and if the deceased has an insurance policy, we are more than capable of making sure everything is completed correctly and in a timely manner.

Am I required to get Death Certificates?

Am I required to get Death Certificates?

No. There is no requirement for the purchase of Death Certificates in Florida. All of the paperwork that is required for the Death Certificates will be filed by Simply Cremations. Once the paperwork is completed by the State Department, the certificates can then be picked up at any Health Department location in Florida (the price varies from county to county). Death Certificates are used to transfer assets from the deceased to the next-of-kin or legal representative.

What is a Direct Disposer?

What is a Direct Disposer?

A Direct Disposer is a type of licensing that allows us to handle your cremation at a truly affordable price. A Direct Disposer does one thing, in our case, it’s a simple cremation. Direct Disposers are not authorized by the state to arrange any type of “memorial services” for the deceased. We have no hearses or chapels (and our price reflects that). Any memorial services would have to be handled by friends or family of the deceased. That being said, we are more than capable of guiding a family through setting up a service on their own (civilian or military).

What about the death of a baby?

What about the death of a baby?

Simply Cremations will cremate any fetus prior to 20 weeks gestation for the fee of $100. These services do not require the filing of a Death Certificate. We will pickup, cremate, and deliver the remains to the responsible party.

Fetal deaths after 20 week gestation require the filing of a Fetal Death Certificate. These Death Certificates however require physically meeting with the doctors office (multiple times) to handle putting together the paperwork for filing with the State. This extra step is the reason that Simply Cremations has a $200 charge for all fetal deaths (plus $15 per death certificate). We will not charge for the actual cremation, or pickup and delivery.

What do I do when a death occurs while out of town or away from home?

What do I do when a death occurs while out of town or away from home?

It’s important that you contact the local medical authorities first (as well as the police, if appropriate), and then make sure to give us a call as soon as possible. We will work with you to make the necessary arrangements to get you and your loved one back home as quickly and easily as possible. Calling us will also help you to avoid duplication of efforts and fees.

What do funeral directors do?

What do funeral directors do?

A funeral director is a licensed professional who specializes in all aspects of funerals and related services. They provide support to the family, guide the arrangement of visitations and funeral ceremonies, prepare the deceased according to the family’s wishes, and ensure that everything goes according to plan. They also arrange for the removal and transportation of the deceased throughout the process and assist families with any legal or insurance-related paperwork they might need to file. They’re experienced at recognizing when an individual is having an extremely difficult time coping with a loss and can provide extra support and recommendations for professional help if needed.

How long does the cremation process take?

How long does the cremation process take?

From the pickup to the delivery of ashes can take anywhere from 3-7 days on average. The process is a simple one. First the Doctor or Medical Examiner will complete their portion of the Death Certificate information. After that is complete, it will be forwarded to the state department. They're protocol will close accounts (such as social security) and within a couple of days, we will recieve the state "permission to cremate" form. We will pair this form with the one that you have filled out and at that time we are allowed to preform the cremation. The actual cremation will take a day to complete and then we will schedule a convienient time to deliver the ashes.

How can I be sure that the remains I receive are those of my loved one?

How can I be sure that the remains I receive are those of my loved one?

Cremation of multiple people at the same time is illegal in the U.S. and many other countries, so the cremation chamber is not designed to hold more than one person at a time. In addition, cremation is a regulated process with strict procedures we follow to ensure we’re holding our services to the highest standard possible. All necessary paperwork and fees must be completed with local authorities, and then a checklist is completed at the crematory. A metal disk with a unique ID number accompanies your loved one from the time we receive the person throughout the cremation process, and after cremation occurs we attach the metal disk to the bag containing the ashes. Knowing the level of respect and meticulous care with which we treat your loved one, you can rest assured that you are receiving only your loved one’s ashes.

Where can I scatter my loved one's cremated remains? Are there any restrictions?

Where can I scatter my loved one's cremated remains? Are there any restrictions?

In general, the government does not regulate the scattering of ashes. Most public parks, including national parks, ask that you submit a formal request and may have restrictions on where you can scatter. If you wish to scatter on private land, consult the landowner first. In most cases, as long as you do your due diligence about checking for rules beforehand and are considerate, it’s more of a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy.

What is a columbarium?

What is a columbarium?

A columbarium is a place for the interment of urns containing cremated remains. They’re often located in mausoleums, chapels, or memorial gardens, and contain numerous small compartments, or niches, designed to hold urns.

What can I do to help the bereaved after services?

What can I do to help the bereaved after services?

The grieving process doesn’t end with the funeral, and it will take time for the bereaved to heal. The family will need your support for months to come, so make sure to check in on a regular basis. Drop a note, make a phone call, and continue to invite them when you make social plans; they’ll let you know if and when they are ready to participate. Reach out to the family on special occasions, like birthdays or anniversaries, especially during the first year following their loss.

What should I say when I run into the bereaved in public?

What should I say when I run into the bereaved in public?

What you’ll say depends upon whether or not you’ve already had contact with the bereaved. If you’ve already offered your condolences, or attended the visitation or service, simply greet the bereaved warmly and express an interest in their wellbeing. If this is your first meeting since the death and you’re in a public setting, it’s best not to bring up the death directly. Instead, say something like, “I understand these must be difficult days for you,” and perhaps ask about when might be a good time to visit, or suggest that you meet for lunch.

© Simply Cremations
Crafted with care by Frazer Consultants and TA

Privacy Policy & Terms of Use